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Leaf n Grain

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Poured, not dripped, please – All about pour-over coffee Pour-over coffee is a favored way among enthusiasts to brew coffee. Some pros are that it gives a clean cup of coffee and makes the finished product simple yet elegant. Some may consider cons are the amount of attention that needs to be paid to the brewing method. From wetting the filter with 150-degree water to coffee ratios, usually 16:1 or less commonly 15:1, the ground size and water temp at extraction. My parameters are as much as possible coarse ground, water temp 200-degree water, and about 4-5 tablespoons of coffee to a kettle of water which is .8 liters. The filter I used was a Melita # 4 paper filter. The coffees I used were the Lavazza Classico roast, Gevalia single origin Guatemala coarse, and Eight o clock original roast whole bean. Before diving headfirst into the coffee and taste, let’s do some fast time travel. It is the early 1900s in Europe, and the on-vogue brewing style was immersion brewing. And with that comes some silt and sludge from the coffee in your cup. The other option is a straightforward espresso machine. However, Mrs. Melita Bentz was not pleased with the current status quo, so she took a pot, poked some holes in it, placed some paper at the bottom for a filter, and brewed coffee with it. Being pleased with the end product, she refined the mechanism some more, and in 1908 she was granted a patient, for now, famous #4 filter. Funny enough, Mrs. Bentz was a German housewife. Who started a company out of her house and grew it substantially and forever changed coffee. Mind you. It would be appropriate to mention that she is still a wife and a mother while starting a company. Sadly…

Top 5 Old-Fashioned Cocktails in DFW-West I’ll have an Old Fashioned, please! History The Old Fashioned is a timeless, classic cocktail with roots dating back to the 1800s. The Pendennis Club of Louisville is often credited with its origination in 1881 using bourbon made by James E. Pepper. However, its roots can be traced back to the earlier part of the century through letters and articles describing cocktails with similar recipes; this is now more of urban legend rather than history. The first published sighting of a recipe titled an Old Fashioned was in Theodore Proulx’s book The Bartender’s Manual (1888). The original recipes were quite different from what we now know as Old Fashioned, consisting of sugar, ice, and the spirit. Eventually, bitters were introduced to cocktails, and other drinks, such as the Sazerac, were beginning to be introduced. The recipe’s base now consists of muddled sugar or simple syrup, an ice cube, bitters, and the spirit. The spirit throughout history consists of either bourbon, rye, brandy, gin, or on occasion, an Irish or Scotch whiskey. However, unless you specify the spirit either in the name or in your request, it will generally be made with a Rye or Bourbon. Other variations of the old-fashioned will come in the form of a smoked, barrel-aged, or possibly a bartender’s choice, such as using a type of bitters other than the classic Angostura aromatic. Top 5 It was in July of 2022 that I started the journey of finding my top 5 old-fashioned cocktails. While I originally intended it to be for all of DFW, after having tried over 500 variations on just the west side, I quickly realized that I needed to focus on just the west side of the metroplex and have multiple categories. With the DFW airport as…

Fall Pork Chops With Apples This classic recipe is super simple and a true treat. Enjoy this recipe and the great flavors it brings. Whatever your taste buds are craving, you can dress it up or down. I trade the apples for pineapples and brown sugar during the summer to have that tropical vibe. 1/4 c. extra-virgin olive oil1 1/2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar2 tsp maple syrup2 tsp whole-grain mustard1/4 tsp Kosher salt1/4 tsp Freshly ground black pepper1 medium red onion (halved and sliced in ¼”-thick wedges)2 sweet-tart apples (such as Honeycrisp or Pink Lady, cored and cut into 8 wedges each)4 1″-thick boneless pork chops (about 1½ lb. total)4 sprigs fresh rosemary Preheat oven to 425° and place racks in the center and upper third of the oven. In a small bowl, whisk olive oil, balsamic, maple syrup, mustard, and ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper.Add onion and apple to a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with half of the balsamic mixture and toss to combine. Season with ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper.Season the pork chops on both sides with 1 teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Nestle the pork chops among the onions and apples. Brush the remaining half of the balsamic mixture on both sides of each chop. Top each chop with a rosemary sprig. Place in the center rack of the oven and bake until apples and onions are softened, about 15 minutes.Increase oven temperature to a high broil. Discard rosemary and place the sheet pan on the rack in the upper third of your oven and broil until chops are slightly caramelized, 3 to 5 minutes, depending on the strength of your broiler. Let pork rest at least 5 minutes before slicing. Serve pork with apples and onions with any pan juices spooned over top.

Congratulations to @bertbesmokin1868 on winning the April Pairing of the Month.  Below is his pairing review! Cigar Pairing Rojas Unfinished Business with Grand Marnier Cordon Rouge I went with the Rojas Unfinished Business Mareva, Box Press, by Noel Rojas with one of my favorite liqueurs Grand Marnier Cordon Rouge for my Pairing of the Month for April. This was a blind pairing but with it being an Ecuadorian Sumatra wrapper, Nicaraguan Binder, Nicaraguan & Mexico filler, and the bitter orange, hazelnuts, and toffee in the drink; I just knew it was going to be an amazing pairing. The cigar had caramel and semi-sweet chocolate smell to it, on the cap and foot was a smell of chocolate. I decided to go with a V-cut and immediately from the cold draw I got hints of hazelnuts, cayenne, and hay. As soon as I got through the first third of the cigar I was hit with spices, the drink to Cigar was excellent. The cognac in the Grand Marnier brought out the woody and black peppercorn spices followed by an orange after taste that lingered in my mouth. The cigar to drink also yielded strong hints of black peppercorn which overpowered the citrus but still paired nicely with the cognac’s subtle spices. I continued to the second third, and it paired beautifully both ways from drink to cigar AND cigar to drink. The chocolate espresso and creamy coffee notes from the cigar with the spices of hazelnuts from the cognac made every puff enjoyable. The citrus aftertaste was also a big plus, almost like a chocolate orange coffee taste. Lastly, the final third. Wow, this last part took me by surprise, the creamy dark espresso, malty chocolate, and sweet cocoa notes of the cigar with the drink turned into an orange…