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FDA, Coffee, and Gas Stations

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FDA, Coffee, and Gas Stations

Recently, Snapchill Coffee out of Wisconsin has recalled over 140 different brands of coffee they produced. The company was forced to do so after the FDA notified them that the way they canned could produce deadly neurotoxins. According to the Hill, there has been no reported sickness, and the coffees affected are not like Folgers or Maxwell House, more like canned coffee you find in a gas station, something like the Starbucks Frappuccino drinks in a glass bottle or the Black Rifle Coffee Company 300 Coffee drinks. Most of the brands seem regional to the Midwest/ Northwest. What does that mean for you and me?

First, let’s talk about RTDs’ place in the market. People buy them as an easy in and out when they’re in a rush and do not have time to wait for a barista to make a drink. They are typically shelf stable, which means if you are on a long shift, you can have it for later when you cannot leave your job. So basically, it boils down to convenience. It is also a better option than an energy drink or nicotine pouches, both popular options for people who work long shifts, like first responders or people in trades that work offshore or in an oilfield. Who else does this?

It’s common for companies to outsource the manufacturing of RTD products. Starbucks was a pioneer in this field, starting in the early 2000s, and was followed by Monster and others. Knowing this is essential because these brands that use Snapchill aren’t trying to lie to their customers; they are following standard industry practices that everyone follows. What will people do now that a few options are gone?

This will drive people to more prominent brands as a safe bet. So Black Rifle Coffee’s 300s and 200s, Monster Coffee, and Dunkin Coffee will most likely see a spike in sales. We will see how this impacts the coffee landscape as Cold brew coffees typically require more coffee than other styles of brewing. So, the amount of coffee required to catch up will probably dry up a lot of “extra” coffee supply, if there is any. Snapchill may or may not survive as a company that is up to the consumers. Due to their large client list and the fact no one is reported sick, they will likely recover from this. A major factor that could change that is how the company chooses to own the decision or how they handle returned products.

My solutions to these are simple: Buy big brand coffee,  Dunkin, BRCC, Monster, etc. I feel comfortable recommending Monster here because we are looking for convenience, not necessarily “good” coffee. Another option would be to buy the cold brew concentrate from your local grocer. It puts you in control of ratios and allows you to have multiple cups of coffee per bottle. Finally, grind pouches or coffee pouches are an excellent option. Lastly, just straight up make your own cold brew. I think the most economical way to do that is with a French Press.

So, while it is sad to see what a large amount of tonnage of coffee could be wasted, it is better safe than sorry. Hopefully, you have a better idea of how the coffee industry deals with RTD products and why consumers buy them. If you have any solutions that are convenient along the same lines as an RTD, then please feel free to share them. It will be interesting to watch coffee prices and how they react to losing so much coffee to the recall. Links to the articles below.

https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/4738606-coffee-recall-botulism-food-poisoning-fda/

Official FDA Announcement

Author

  • David Jeffries

    Growing up as a military brat and a pastor’s kid, I tried only to cause a good kind of mayhem. I first got into coffee while studying at Mary-Hardin Baylor. My life group leader is the one responsible. Before this, I drank coffee and enjoyed it, but I wasn’t passionate about it. Some of my favorite parts are when I get the opportunity to roast coffee beans or drink exceptionally well-crafted coffee drinks. I am looking forward to reviewing the various coffees the world has to offer and seeing your thoughts and opinions as well. David Jefferies

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Author

Growing up as a military brat and a pastor’s kid, I tried only to cause a good kind of mayhem. I first got into coffee while studying at Mary-Hardin Baylor. My life group leader is the one responsible. Before this, I drank coffee and enjoyed it, but I wasn’t passionate about it. Some of my favorite parts are when I get the opportunity to roast coffee beans or drink exceptionally well-crafted coffee drinks. I am looking forward to reviewing the various coffees the world has to offer and seeing your thoughts and opinions as well. David Jefferies

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